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  • Ronnie Tucker: Systemd Creator Says Linux Community Is Rotten, Points at Linus Torvalds as the Source

    The creator of systemd, Lennart Poettering, had some very harsh words to say about the Linux community and about one of its role models, Linus Torvalds.

    It might seem that the Linux community in its entirety is all about rainbows and bunnies, but the truth is that it’s made up of regular people and the likes. Most of the other communities are formed in this way and Linux is no exception. The problem is that Linus is pegged as one of the people responsible by Lennart Poettering.

    There has been some small friction between the two projects, Linux and systemd, but nothing that would indicate that something was amiss. In fact, when asked what he thought about systemd, just a couple of weeks ago, Linus Torvalds was actually very tactful about it.

    Source:

    http://news.softpedia.com/news/Systemd-Creator-Say-Linux-Community-Is-Rotten-Points-at-Linus-Torvalds-as-the-Source-461219.shtml

    Submitted by: Silviu Stahie



  • Bryan Quigley: Still running 32 bit Ubuntu?

    I’m considering a proposal to have 16.04 LTS be the last release of Ubuntu with 32 bit images to run on 32 bit only machines (on x86 aka Intel/AMD only – this has no bearing on ARM). You would still be able to run 32 bit applications on 64 bit Ubuntu.

    Please answer my survey on how this would affect you or your organization.

    If you can’t see the form below click here.

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  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 388

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #388 for the week October 13 – 19, 2014, and the full version is available here.

    In this issue we cover:

    The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

    • Paul White
    • Elizabeth K. Joseph
    • John Mahoney
    • And many others

    If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

    Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License



  • The Fridge: Happy 10th Birthday Ubuntu!

    10 years ago today, Mark Shuttleworth made the 4th post ever to the ubuntu-announce mailing list when he wrote: Announcing Ubuntu 4.10 “The Warty Warthog Release”

    In this announcement, Mark wrote:

    Ubuntu is a new Linux distribution that brings together the extraordinary breadth of Debian with a fast and easy install, regular releases (every six months), a tight selection of excellent packages installed by default and a commitment to security updates with 18 months of security and technical support for every release.

    So it’s with much excitement, the Ubuntu News team wishes Ubuntu a happy 10th Birthday!

    Ubuntu cake

    Over the years, we’ve had several cakes celebrating releases, here are a sampling we found on Flickr, first from the 8.04 release party in London:

    ubuntu cake

    And an amazing trio from Kitchener-Waterloo, Ontario, Canada for 9.10, 10.10 and 11.04:

    Ubuntu 9.10: Karmic Koala Release Party
    CIMG4679.JPG
    CIMG4817

    And dozens of strictly Ubuntu logo cakes over the years (this one from 2006):

    Ubuntu cake!!

    With the release of 14.10 just days away, enjoy your release parties and perhaps take some time to reflect upon how far we’ve come in these 10 years!

    Posted by Elizabeth K. Joseph, on behalf of the Ubuntu News Team



  • Jono Bacon: Happy Birthday Ubuntu!

    Today is Ubuntu’s ten year anniversary. Scott did a wonderful job summarizing many of those early years and his own experience, and while I won’t be as articulate as him, I wanted to share a few thoughts on my experience too.

    I heard of this super secret Debian startup from Scott James Remnant. When I worked at OpenAdvantage we would often grab lunch in Birmingham, and he filled me in on what he was working on, but leaving a bunch of the blanks out due to confidentiality.

    I was excited about this new mystery distribution. For many years I had been advocating at conferences about a consumer-facing desktop, and felt that Debian and GNOME, complete with the exciting Project Utopia work from Robert Love and David Zeuthen made sense. This was precisely what this new distro would be shipping.

    When Warty was released I installed it and immediately became an Ubuntu user. Sure, it was simple, but the level of integration was a great step forward. More importantly though, what really struck me was how community-focused Ubuntu was. There was open governance, a Code Of Conduct, fully transparent mailing lists and IRC channels, and they had the Oceans 11 of rock-star developers involved from Debian, GNOME, and elsewhere.

    I knew I wanted to be part of this.

    While at GUADEC in Stuttgart I met Mark Shuttleworth and had a short meeting with him. He seemed a pretty cool guy, and I invited him to speak at our very first LugRadio Live in Wolverhampton.

    Mark at LugRadio Live.

    I am not sure how many multi-millionaires would consider speaking to 250 sweaty geeks in a football stadium sports bar in Wolverhampton, but Mark did it, not once, but twice. In fact, one time he took a helicopter to Wolverhampton and landed at the dog racing stadium. We had to have a debate in the LugRadio team for who had the nicest car to pick him up in. It was not me.

    This second LugRadio Live appearance was memorable because two weeks previous I had emailed Mark to see if he had a spot for me at Canonical. OpenAdvantage was a three-year funded project and was wrapping up, and I was looking at other options.

    Mark’s response was:

    “Well, we are opening up an Ubuntu Community Manager position, but I am not sure it is for you.”

    I asked him if he could send over the job description. When I read it I knew I wanted to do it.

    Fast forward four interviews, the last of which being in his kitchen (which didn’t feel awkward, at all), and I got the job.

    The day I got that job was one of the greatest days of my life. I felt like I had won the lottery; working on a project with mission, meaning, and something that could grow my career and skill-set.

    Canonical team in 2007

    The day I got the job was not without worry though.

    I was going to be working with people like Colin Watson, Scott James Remnant, Martin Pitt, Matt Zimmerman, Robert Collins, and Ben Collins. How on earth was I going to measure up?

    A few months later I flew out to my first Ubuntu Developer Summit in Mountain View, California. Knowing little about California in November, I packed nothing but shorts and t-shirts. Idiot.

    I will always remember the day I arrived, going to a bar with Scott and some others, meeting the team, and knowing absolutely nothing about what they were saying. It sounded like gibberish, and I felt like I was a fairly technical guy at this point. Obviously not.

    What struck me though was how kind, patient, and friendly everyone was. The delta in technical knowledge was narrowed with kindness and mentoring. I met some of my heroes, and they were just normal people wanting to make an awesome Linux distro, and wanting to help others get in on the ride too.

    What followed was an incredible seven and a half years. I travelled to Ubuntu Developer Summits, sprints, and conferences in more than 30 countries, helped create a global community enthused by a passion for openness and collaboration, experimented with different methods of getting people to work together, and met some of the smartest and kindest people walking on this planet.

    The awesome Ubuntu community

    Ubuntu helped to define my career, but more importantly, it helped to define my perspective and outlook on life. My experience in Ubuntu helped me learn how to think, to manage, and to process and execute ideas. It helped me to be a better version of me, and to fill my world with good people doing great things, all of which inspired my own efforts.

    This is the reason why Ubuntu has always been much more than just software to me. It is a philosophy, an ethos, and most importantly, a family. While some of us have moved on from Canonical, and some others have moved on from Ubuntu, one thing we will always share is this remarkable experience and a special connection that makes us Ubuntu people.