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  • Ubuntu App Developer Blog: It’s time for a Scope development competition!

    With all of the new documentation coming to support the development of Unity Scopes, it’s time for us to have another development shodown! Contestants will have five (5) weeks to develop a project, from scratch, and submit it to the Ubuntu Store. But this time all of the entries must be Scopes.

    Be sure to update to the latest SDK packages to ensure that you have the correct template and tools. You should also create a new Click chroot to get the latest build and runtime packages.

    Prizes

    prizesWe’ve got some great prizes lined up for the winners of this competition.

    • 1st place will win a new Dell XPS 13 Laptop, Developer Edition (preloaded with Ubuntu)
    • Runners up will receive one of:
      • Logitech UE Boom Bluetooth speakers
      • Nexus 7 running Ubuntu
      • An Ubuntu bundle, featuring:
        • Ubuntu messenger bag
        • Ubuntu Touch Infographic T-shirt
        • Ubuntu Neoprene Laptop Sleeve
      • An Ubuntu bundle, featuring:
        • Ubuntu backpack
        • Ubuntu Circle of Friends Dot Design T-shirt
        • Ubuntu Neoprene Laptop Sleeve

    Judging

    Scope entries will be reviewed by a panel of judges from a variety of backgrounds and specialties, all of whom will evaluate the scope based on the following criteria:

    • General Interest – Scopes that are of more interest to general phone users will be scored higher. We recommend identifying what kind of content phone users want to have fast, easy access to and then finding an online source where you can query for it
    • Creativity – Scopes are a unique way of bringing content and information to a user, and we’ve only scratched the surface of what they can do. Thinking outside the box and providing something new and exciting will lead to a higher score for your Scope
    • Features – There’s more to scopes than basic searching, take advantage of the departments, categories and settings APIs to enhance the functionality of your Scope
    • Design – Scopes offer a variety of ways to customize the way content is displayed, from different layouts to visual styling. Take full advantage of what’s possible to provide a beautiful presentation of your results.
    • Awareness / Promotion – we will award extra points to those of you who blog, tweet, facebook, Google+, reddit, and otherwise share updates and information about your scope as it progresses.

    The judges for this contest are:

    • Chris Wayne developer behind a number of current pre-installed Scopes
    • Joey-Elijah Sneddon Author and editor of Omg!Ubuntu!
    • Victor Thompson Ubuntu Core Apps developer
    • Jouni Helminen Designer at Canonical
    • Alan Pope from the Ubuntu Community Team at Canonical

    Learn how to write Ubuntu Scopes

    To get things started we’ve recently introduced a new Unity Scope project template into the Ubuntu SDK, you can use this to get a working foundation for your code right away. Then you can follow along with our new SoundCloud scope tutorial to learn how to tailor your code to a remote data source and give your scope a unique look and feel that highlights both the content and the source. To help you out along the way, we’ll be scheduling a series of online Workshops that will cover how to use the Ubuntu SDK and the Scope APIs. In the last weeks of the contest we will also be hosting a hackathon on our IRC channel (#ubuntu-app-devel on Freenode) to answer any last questions and help you get your c If you cannot join those, you can still find everything you need to know in our scope developer documentation.

    How to participate

    If you are not a programmer and want to share some ideas for cool scopes, be sure to add and vote for scopes on our reddit page. The contest is free to enter and open to everyone. The five week period starts on the Thursday 30th October and runs until Wednesday 3rd December 2014! Enter the Ubuntu Scope Showdown >



  • Ronnie Tucker: Packt offers library subscription with additional $150 worth of free content

    As  you may know, Packt Publishing supports Full Circle Magazine with review copies of books, so it’s only fair that we help them by bringing this offer to your attention:

    packt

    PacktLib provides full online access to over 2000 books and videos to give users the knowledge they need, when they need it. From innovative new solutions and effective learning services to cutting edge guides on emerging technologies, Packt’s extensive library has got it covered. For a limited time only, Packt is offering 5 free eBook or Video downloads in the first month of a new annual subscription – up to $150 worth of extra content. That’s in addition to one free download a month for the rest of the year.

    This special PacktLib Plus offer marks the release of the new and improved reading and watching platform, packed with new features.

    The deal expires on 4 November.



  • Alessio Treglia: Handling identities in distributed Linux cloud instances

    I’ve many distributed Linux instances across several clouds, be them global, such as Amazon or Digital Ocean, or regional clouds such as TeutoStack or Enter.

    Probably many of you are facing the same issue: having a consistent UNIX identity across all multiple instances. While in an ideal world LDAP would be a perfect choice, letting LDAP open to the wild Internet is not a great idea.

    So, how to solve this issue, while being secure? The trick is to use the new NSS module for SecurePass.

    While SecurePass has been traditionally used into the operating system just as a two factor authentication, the new beta release is capable of holding “extended attributes”, i.e. arbitrary information for each user profile.

    We will use SecurePass to authenticate users and store Unix information with this new capability. In detail, we will:

    • Use PAM to authenticate the user via RADIUS
    • Use the new NSS module for SecurePass to have a consistent UID/GID/….

     SecurePass and extended attributes

    The next generation of SecurePass (currently in beta) is capable of storing arbitrary data for each profile. This is called “Extended Attributes” (or xattrs) and -as you can imagine- is organized as key/value pair.

    You will need the SecurePass tools to be able to modify users’ extended attributes. The new releases of Debian Jessie and Ubuntu Vivid Vervet have a package for it, just:

    # apt-get install securepass-tools

    ERRATA CORRIGE: securepass-tools hasn’t been uploaded to Debian yet, Alessio is working hard to make the package available in time for Jessie though.

    For other distributions or previous releases, there’s a python package (PIP) available. Make sure that you have pycurl installed and then:

    # pip install securepass-tools

    While SecurePass tools allow local configuration file, we highly recommend for this tutorial to create a global /etc/securepass.conf, so that it will be useful for the NSS module. The configuration file looks like:

    [default]
    app_id = xxxxx
    app_secret = xxxx
    endpoint = https://beta.secure-pass.net/

    Where app_id and app_secrets are valid API keys to access SecurePass beta.

    Through the command line, we will be able to set UID, GID and all the required Unix attributes for each user:

    # sp-user-xattrs user@domain.net set posixuid 1000

    While posixuid is the bare minimum attribute to have a Unix login, the following attributes are valid:

    • posixuid → UID of the user
    • posixgid → GID of the user
    • posixhomedir → Home directory
    • posixshell → Desired shell
    • posixgecos → Gecos (defaults to username)

    Install and Configure NSS SecurePass

    In a similar way to the tools, Debian Jessie and Ubuntu Vivid Vervet have native package for SecurePass:

    # apt-get install libnss-securepass

    For previous releases of Debian and Ubuntu can still run the NSS module, as well as CentOS and RHEL. Download the sources from:

    https://github.com/garlsecurity/nss_securepass

    Then:

    ./configure
    make
    make install (Debian/Ubuntu Only)

    For CentOS/RHEL/Fedora you will need to copy files in the right place:

    /usr/bin/install -c -o root -g root libnss_sp.so.2 /usr/lib64/libnss_sp.so.2
    ln -sf libnss_sp.so.2 /usr/lib64/libnss_sp.so

    The /etc/securepass.conf configuration file should be extended to hold defaults for NSS by creating an [nss] section as follows:

    [nss]
    realm = company.net
    default_gid = 100
    default_home = "/home"
    default_shell = "/bin/bash"

    This will create defaults in case values other than posixuid are not being used. We need to configure the Name Service Switch (NSS) to use SecurePass. We will change the /etc/nsswitch.conf by adding “sp” to the passwd entry as follows:

    $ grep sp /etc/nsswitch.conf
     passwd:     files sp

    Double check that NSS is picking up our new SecurePass configuration by querying the passwd entries as follows:

    $ getent passwd user
     user:x:1000:100:My User:/home/user:/bin/bash
    $ id user
     uid=1000(user)  gid=100(users) groups=100(users)

    Using this setup by itself wouldn’t allow users to login to a system because the password is missing. We will use SecurePass’ authentication to access the remote machine.

    Configure PAM for SecurePass

    On Debian/Ubuntu, install the RADIUS PAM module with:

    # apt-get install libpam-radius-auth

    If you are using CentOS or RHEL, you need to have the EPEL repository configured. In order to activate EPEL, follow the instructions on http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/EPEL

    Be aware that this has not being tested with SE-Linux enabled (check off or permissive).

    On CentOS/RHEL, install the RADIUS PAM module with:

    # yum -y install pam_radius

    Note: as per the time of writing, EPEL 7 is still in beta and does not contain the Radius PAM module. A request has been filed through RedHat’s Bugzilla to include this package also in EPEL 7

    Configure SecurePass with your RADIUS device. We only need to set the public IP Address of the server, a fully qualified domain name (FQDN), and the secret password for the radius authentication. In case of the server being under NAT, specify the public IP address that will be translated into it. After completion we get a small recap of the already created device. For the sake of example, we use “secret” as our secret password.

    Configure the RADIUS PAM module accordingly, i.e. open /etc/pam_radius.conf and add the following lines:

    radius1.secure-pass.net secret 3
    radius2.secure-pass.net secret 3

    Of course the “secret” is the same we have set up on the SecurePass administration interface. Beyond this point we need to configure the PAM to correct manage the authentication.

    In CentOS, open the configuration file /etc/pam.d/password-auth-ac; in Debian/Ubuntu open the /etc/pam.d/common-auth configuration and make sure that pam_radius_auth.so is in the list.

    auth required   pam_env.so
    auth sufficient pam_radius_auth.so try_first_pass
    auth sufficient pam_unix.so nullok try_first_pass
    auth requisite  pam_succeed_if.so uid >= 500 quiet
    auth required   pam_deny.so

    Conclusions

    Handling many distributed Linux poses several challenges, from software updates to identity management and central logging.  In a cloud scenario, it is not always applicable to use traditional enterprise solutions, but new tools might become very handy.

    To freely subscribe to securepass beta, join SecurePass on: http://www.secure-pass.net/open
    And then send an e-mail to info@garl.ch requesting beta access.



  • Rhonda D'Vine: Feminist Year

    If someone would have told me that I would visit three feminist events this year I would have slowly nodded at them and responded with "yeah, sure..." not believing it. But sometimes things take their own turns.

    It all started with the Debian Women Mini-Debconf in Barcelona. The organizers did ask me how they have to word the call for papers so that I would feel invited to give a speech, which felt very welcoming and nice. So we settled for "people who identify themselves as female". Due to private circumstances I didn't prepare well for my talk, but I hope it was still worth it. The next interesting part though happened later when there were lightning talks. Someone on IRC asked why there are male people in the lightning talks, which was explicitly allowed for them only. This also felt very very nice, to be honest, that my talk wasn't questioned. Those are amongst the reasons why I wrote My place is here, my home is Debconf.

    Second event I went to was the FemCamp Wien. It was my first event that was a barcamp, I didn't know what to expect organization wise. Topic-wise it was set about Queer Feminism. And it was the first event that I went to which had a policy. Granted, there was an extremely silly written part in it, which naturally ended up in a shit storm on twitter (which people from both sides did manage very badly, which disappointed me). Denying that there is sexism against cis-males is just a bad idea, but the background of it was that this wasn't the topic of this event. The background of the policy was that usually barcamps but events in general aren't considered that save of a place for certain people, and that this barcamp wanted to make it clear that people usually shying away from such events in the fear of harassment can feel at home there.
    And what can I say, this absolutely was the right thing to do. I never felt any more welcomed and included in any event, including Debian events—sorry to say that so frankly. Making it clear through the policy that everyone is on the same boat with addressing each other respectfully totally managed to do exactly that. The first session of the event about dominant talk patterns and how to work around or against them also made sure that the rest of the event was giving shy people a chance to speak up and feel comfortable, too. And the range of the sessions that were held was simply great. This was the event that I came up with the pattern that I have to define the quality of an event on the sessions that I'm unable to attend. The thing that hurt me most in the afterthought was that I couldn't attend the session about minorities within minorities. :/

    Last but not least I attended AdaCamp Berlin. This was a small unconference/barcamp dedicated to increase women's participation in open technology and culture named after Ada Lovelace who is considered the first programmer. It was a small event with only 50 slots for people who identify as women. So I was totally hyper when I received the mail that was accepted. It was another event with a policy, and at first reading it looked strange. But given that there are people who are allergic to ingredients of scents, it made sense to raise awareness of that topic. And given that women are facing a fair amount of harassment in the IT and at events, it also makes sense to remind people to behave. After all it was a general policy for all AdaCamps, not for this specific one with only women.
    I enjoyed the event. Totally. And that's not only because I was able to meet up with a dear friend who I haven't talked to in years, literally. I enjoyed the environment, and the sessions that were going on. And quite similar to the FemCamp, it started off with a session that helped a lot for the rest of the event. This time it was about the Impostor Syndrome which is extremely common for women in IT. And what can I say, I found myself in one of the slides, given that I just tweeted the day before that I doubted to belong there. Frankly spoken, it even crossed my mind that I was only accepted so that at least one trans person is there. Which is pretty much what the impostor syndrome is all about, isn't it. But when I was there, it did feel right. And we had great sessions that I truly enjoyed. And I have to thank one lady once again for her great definition on feminism that she brought up during one session, which is roughly that feminism for her isn't about gender but equality of all people regardless their sexes or gender definition. It's about dropping this whole binary thinking. I couldn't agree more.

    All in all, I totally enjoyed these events, and hope that I'll be able to attend more next year. From what I grasped all three of them think of doing it again, the FemCamp Vienna already has the date announced at the end of this year's event, so I am looking forward to meet most of these fine ladies again, if faith permits. And keep in mind, there will always be critics and haters out there, but given that thy wouldn't think of attending such an event anyway in the first place, don't get wound up about it. They just try to talk you down.

    P.S.: Ah, almost forgot about one thing to mention, which also helps a lot to reduce some barrier for people to attend: The catering during the day and for lunch both at FemCamp and AdaCamp (there was no organized catering at the Debian Women Mini-Debconf) did take off the need for people to ask about whether there could be food without meat and dairy products by offering mostly Vegan food in the first place, even without having to query the participants. Often enough people otherwise choose to go out of the event or bring their own food instead of asking for it, so this is an extremely welcoming move, too. Way to go!

    /personal | permanent link | Comments: 0 | Flattr this



  • Jonathan Riddell: Kubuntu Vivid in Bright Blue

    KDE Project:

    Kubuntu Vivid is the development name for what will be released in April next year as Kubuntu 15.04.

    The exiting news is that following some discussion and some wavering we will be switching to Plasma 5 by default. It has shown itself as a solid and reliable platform and it's time to show it off to the world.

    There are some bits which are missing from Plasma 5 and we hope to fill those in over the next six months. Click on our Todo board above if you want to see what's in store and if you want to help out!

    The other change that affects workflow is we're now using Debian git to store our packaging in a kubuntu branch so hopefully it'll be easier to share updates.