Department of Chemistry

...California State University Stanislaus

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Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily
Earth and Climate Chemistry. Full text articles on organic and inorganic chemistry in the environment. Updated daily.

Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily
  • New phase of carbon discovered: Making diamonds at room temperature
    Scientists have discovered a new phase of solid carbon, called Q-carbon, which is distinct from the known phases of graphite and diamond. They have also developed a technique for using Q-carbon to make diamond-related structures at room temperature and at ambient atmospheric pressure in air.

  • Benefits and trade-offs of low-carbon energy
    Policymakers, industry and government officials will have to invest US $2.5 trillion for electricity generation over the next 20 years. A new report presents the environmental costs and benefits linked to different renewable energy sources, and makes one thing abundantly clear: anything is better than coal.

  • Moonlighting molecules: Finding new uses for old enzymes
    Researchers have identified a potentially significant new application for a well-known human enzyme, which may have implications for treating respiratory diseases such as asthma.

  • Tiny octopods catalyze bright ideas
    Researchers demonstrate plasmonic nanoparticles can support catalysts without losing their beneficial optical properties. Such alloys could make industrial processes more efficient or enable sun-driven chemical reactions.

  • Doping powers new thermoelectric material
    In power production, nearly two-thirds of energy input from fossil fuels is lost as waste heat. Industry is hungry for materials that can convert this heat to useful electricity, but a good thermoelectric material is hard to find. Researchers now report that doping tin selenide with sodium boosts its performance as a thermoelectric material, pushing it toward usefulness. The doped material produces a significantly greater amount of electricity than the undoped material, given the same amount of heat input.

  • Coming to a monitor near you: A defect-free, molecule-thick film
    A research team has found a simple way to fix defects in atomically thin monolayer semiconductors. The development could open doors to transparent LED displays, ultra-high efficiency solar cells, photo detectors and nanoscale transistors.

  • Specifically controlling the structure of macromolecules
    Researchers will develop new synthesis processes for long-chain molecules in order to characterize and construct them with so far unreached precision. This will result in an innovative leap in a number of material classes, they say.

  • Shedding light on oil behaviors before the next spill
    There are still critical research gaps hampering efforts to both assess the environmental impacts of crude oil spills and to effectively remediate them, a Canadian, comprehensive scientific report has concluded.

  • Discovery could open door to frozen preservation of tissues, whole organs
    A new approach to 'vitrification,' or ice-free cryopreservation, has been discovered, which could ultimately allow a much wider use of extreme cold to preserve tissues and even organs for later use.

  • Why E. coli move faster in syrup-like fluids than in water
    Swimming in a pool of syrup would be difficult for most people, but for bacteria like E. coli, it's easier than swimming in water. Scientists have known for decades that these cells move faster and farther in viscoelastic fluids, such as the saliva, mucus, and other bodily fluids they are likely to call home, but didn't understand why. New findings could inform disease models and treatments, or even help design microscopic swimming robots.