Department of Chemistry

...California State University Stanislaus

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Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily
Earth and Climate Chemistry. Full text articles on organic and inorganic chemistry in the environment. Updated daily.

Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily
  • 'Holy grail' of battery design achieved: Stable lithium anode
    Researchers report that they have taken a big step toward accomplishing what battery designers have been trying to do for decades -- design a pure lithium anode. All batteries have three basic components: an electrolyte to provide electrons, an anode to discharge those electrons, and a cathode to receive them. The nanosphere layer of a newly created battery design resembles a honeycomb: it creates a flexible, uniform and non-reactive film that protects the unstable lithium from the drawbacks that have made it such a challenge.

  • New system to detect mercury in water systems
    A new ultra-sensitive, low-cost and portable system for detecting mercury in environmental water has been developed by researchers. "The promising sensing performance of this system along with its cost-competiveness and portability make it an excellent potential alternative to current analytical techniques," says the project's leader. "This technique could provide the basis for future point-of-analysis systems for monitoring water quality on site and may help implement better monitoring processes around the world."

  • Breakthrough laser experiment reveals liquid-like motion of atoms within an ultra-cold cluster
    A new study has furthered our understanding of how tiny nanosystems function, unlocking the potential to create new materials using nanosized ‘building blocks’.

  • New approach to form non-equilibrium structures
    Researchers get closer to understanding the fundamentals of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures, unlocking potential in a variety of fields. By injecting energy through oscillations, researchers can force particles to self assemble under non-equilibrium conditions, they report.

  • Cost-effective, solvothermal synthesis of heteroatom (S or N)-doped graphene developed
    A research team has developed cost-effective technology to synthesize sulfur-doped and nitrogen-doped graphenes which can be applied as high performance electrodes for secondary batteries and fuel cells.

  • Dream come true for chemists? Creating organic zeolites
    Traditionally, zeolites have been derived from inorganic material like silicon or aluminum. For the past several years, one research team has focused on combining zeolites with organic polymers whose main component is carbon, oxygen, hydrogen or nitrogen. A new technique and the new materials it produces can be immediately useful in catalysis and separations for chemicals production and hydrocarbon conversion for energy applications.

  • Eco-pottery product from water treatment sludge
    Sludge obtained from water treatment plants were studied as suitable materials to be used in the pottery industry to make suitable pottery products.

  • Spinach could lead to alternative energy more powerful than Popeye
    Spinach gave Popeye super strength, but it also holds the promise of a different power for a group of scientists: the ability to convert sunlight into a clean, efficient alternative fuel. Physicists are using spinach to study the proteins involved in photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert the sun's energy into carbohydrates used to power cellular processes. Artificial photosynthesis could allow for the conversion of solar energy into renewable, environmentally friendly hydrogen-based fuels.

  • Dead body feeding larvae useful in forensic investigations
    Non-biting blow fly Chrysomya megacephala is commonly found in dead bodies and is used in forensic investigations to determine the time of death, referred to as the post mortem interval. A report of synanthropic derived form of C. megacephala from Tamil Nadu is provided for the first time based on morphological features and molecular characterization through generation of DNA barcoding.

  • Nano-sized chip picks up scent of explosives molecules better than dog's nose
    A groundbreaking nanotechnology-inspired sensor picks up the scent of explosives molecules better than a detection dog's nose. The device is mobile, inexpensive, and highly accurate, detecting explosives in the air at concentrations as low as a few molecules per 1,000 trillion. Existing explosives sensors are expensive, bulky and require expert interpretation of the findings.