Department of Chemistry

...California State University Stanislaus

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home News Feeds Science Daily
Newsfeeds
Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily
Earth and Climate Chemistry. Full text articles on organic and inorganic chemistry in the environment. Updated daily.

Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily
  • Hydrogen production in extreme bacterium
    Scientists have discovered a bacterium that can produce hydrogen, an element that one day could lessen the world’s dependence on oil.

  • New method allows for greater variation in band gap tunability
    If you can't find the ideal material, then design a new one. By manipulating the ordered arrangement of atoms in layered complex oxide materials, scientists have found a way to control their electronic band gaps, which determines the electrical behavior of the material and how it interacts with light.

  • DNA nanoswitches reveal how life's molecules connect
    'Bio-molecular interaction analysis, a cornerstone of biomedical research, is traditionally accomplished using equipment that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars,' said the senior author of a new study. 'Rather than develop a new instrument, we've created a nanoscale tool made from strands of DNA that can detect and report how molecules behave, enabling biological measurements to be made by almost anyone, using only common and inexpensive laboratory reagents.'

  • Understanding the reinforcing ability of carbon nanotubes
    A new article explores what is preventing the reinforcing ability of carbon nanotubes from being used in a ceramic matrix. Ever since their discovery, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered the ultimate additive to improve the mechanical properties of structural ceramics, such as aluminum oxide, silicon nitride and zirconium dioxide. Yet despite the remarkable strength and stiffness of CNTs, many studies have reported only marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties after these super-materials were added.

  • Water purification: Running fuel cells on bacteria
    Researchers in Norway have succeeded in getting bacteria to power a fuel cell. The "fuel" used is wastewater, and the products of the process are purified water droplets and electricity. This is an environmentally-friendly process for the purification of water derived from industrial processes and suchlike. It also generates small amounts of electricity – in practice enough to drive a small fan, a sensor or a light-emitting diode. In the future, the researchers hope to scale up this energy generation to enable the same energy to be used to power the water purification process, which commonly consists of many stages, often involving mechanical and energy-demanding decontamination steps at its outset.

  • Pinholes are pitfalls for high performance solar cells
    The most popular next-generation solar cells under development may have a problem – the top layer is full of tiny pinholes, researchers have found.

  • Where did the missing oil go? New study says some is sitting on the Gulf floor
    Some 6 million to 10 million gallons of oil from the BP oil spill are buried in the sediment on the Gulf floor, about 62 miles southeast of the Mississippi Delta, researchers have discovered.

  • Vehicle body made from cotton, hemp, and wood
    Carbon and glass fibers reinforce synthetics so that they can be used for vehicle body construction. But in this regard, there is an abundance of potential found in natural fibers -- obtained from hemp, cotton, or wood. If you combined bio-based textile and carbon fibers, you can obtain extremely light yet very sturdy components.

  • Nanomedicines of the future will build on quantum chemistry
    Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same calculations may be used to produce tomorrow’s cancer drugs, experts say.

  • Researchers produce two bio-fuels from a single algae
    A common algae commercially grown to make fish food holds promise as a source for both biodiesel and jet fuel, according to a new study.