Department of Chemistry

...California State University Stanislaus

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home News Feeds Science Daily
Newsfeeds
Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily
Earth and Climate Chemistry. Full text articles on organic and inorganic chemistry in the environment. Updated daily.

Geochemistry News -- ScienceDaily
  • Facetless crystals that mimic starfish shells could advance 3-D-printing pills
    In a design that mimics a hard-to-duplicate texture of starfish shells, engineers have made rounded crystals that have no facets.

  • Scientists create possible precursor to life
    How did life originate? And can scientists create life? These questions not only occupy the minds of scientists interested in the origin of life, but also researchers working with technology of the future. If we can create artificial living systems, we may not only understand the origin of life -- we can also revolutionize the future of technology.

  • In between red light and blue light: New functionality of molecular light switches
    Diatoms play an important role in water quality and in the global climate. They generate about one fourth of the oxygen in the Earth’s atmosphere and perform around one-quarter of the global carbon dioxide assimilation, i.e. they convert carbon dioxide into organic substances. Their light receptors are a crucial factor in this process. Researchers have now discovered that blue and red light sensing photoreceptors control the carbon flow in these algae.

  • Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires
    Physicists report that they've used a new imaging technique, electrostatic force microscopy, to resolve the biological debate with evidence from physics, showing that electric charges do indeed propagate along microbial nanowires just as they do in carbon nanotubes, a highly conductive human-made material.

  • Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream
    For the last 20 years, scientists have tried to design large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depth and complex features -- a design quest just fulfilled by scientists. The team built 32 DNA crystals with precisely-defined depth and an assortment of sophisticated three-dimensional features.

  • Impact of offshore wind farms on marine species
    Offshore wind power is a valuable source of renewable energy that can help reduce carbon emissions. Technological advances are allowing higher capacity turbines to be installed in deeper water, but there is still much unknown about the effects on the environment. Scientists have now reviewed the potential impacts of offshore wind developments on marine species and make recommendations for future monitoring and assessment as interest in offshore wind energy grows around the world.

  • Simple and versatile way to build 3-D materials of the future
    Researchers have developed a novel yet simple technique, called 'diffusion driven layer-by-layer assembly,' to construct graphene into porous three-dimensional structures for applications in devices such as batteries and supercapacitors.

  • Optimal particle size for anticancer nanomedicines discovered
    Nanomedicines consisting of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to specific tissues and cells offer new solutions for cancer diagnosis and therapy. In a recent study, researchers systematically evaluated the size-dependent biological profiles of three monodisperse drug-silica nanoconjugates to determine the optimum particle size for tissue penetration and tumor inhibition.

  • A brighter design emerges for low-cost, 'greener' LED light bulbs
    The phase-out of traditional incandescent bulbs in the U.S. and elsewhere, as well as a growing interest in energy efficiency, has given light-emitting diode lighting a sales boost. However, that trend could be short-lived as key materials known as rare earth elements become more expensive. Scientists have now designed new materials for making household light-emitting diode bulbs without using these ingredients.

  • Scientists create new protein-based material with some nerve
    Scientists have taken proteins from nerve cells and used them to create a 'smart' material that is extremely sensitive to its environment. The work could lead to new types of biological sensors, flow valves and controlled drug release systems, they report.